Category Archives: Open Science

Open Access VIS 2019 – Part 3 – Who’s Who

This is part 3 of a multi-part post summarizing open practices in visualization research for 2019, as displayed on Open Access Vis. Research openness can either rely on policy or individual behavior. In this part, I’ll look at the individuals. Who in the visualization community is consistently sharing the most research? And who is not?

Related posts: 2017 overview, 2018 overview, 2019 part 1 – Updates and Papers, 2019 part 2 – Research Practices

Whose papers are open?

Many authors are sharing most or even all of their papers on open repositories, which is fantastic progress. But many are not, despite encouragement after acceptance. Easier options, better training, and formal policies will likely be necessary for a field-wide change in behavior. Continue reading

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Open Access VIS 2019 – Part 2 – Research Practices

This is part 2 of a multi-part post summarizing open practices in visualization research for 2019. See Open Access Vis for all open research at VIS 2019.

This post describes the sharing of research artifacts, or components, of the research process itself rather than simply the paper. I refer to sharing both these artifacts and the paper as “open research practices”.

Related posts: 2017 overview, 2018 overview, 2019 part 1 – Updates and Papers, 2019 part 3 – Who’s who?

Open research artifacts for 2019

I’ve broken research transparency into 4 artifacts and counted the number of papers on an open persistent repository that linked to each. I’ve given “partial credit” if the component is available but not on a persistent repository.

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Open Access VIS 2019 – Part 1 – Updates and Papers

The purpose of Open Access Vis is to highlight open access papers and transparent research practices on persistent repositories outside of a paywall. See the about page and my paper on Open Practices in Visualization Research for more details.

Most visualization research is funded by the public, reviewed and edited by volunteers, and formatted by the authors. So for IEEE to charge $33 for each person who wants to read the paper is… well… (I’ll let you fill in the blank). This paywall as well as the general opacity of research practices and artifacts is contrary to the supposedly public good of research and the claim that visualization research helps practitioners who are not on a university campus. And this need for accessibility extends to all research artifacts for both scientific scrutiny and applicability.

This is part 1 of a multi-part post summarizing open practices in visualization research for 2019.
Related posts: 2017 overview, 2018 overview, 2019 part 2 – Research Practices, 2019 part 3 – Who’s who?

Updates for 2019

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